Three stage water filtration for drinking water in Thailand

 

Following is a Siamerican Video Blog (Vlog) that was conducted on Saturday, November 5, 2011 in Phuket Thailand.

Amid central Thailand’s worst flood in centuries, consumer good shortages have risen along with the water levels.

Of the shortages, particularly and ironically is water — bottled water.

Stocks clear and shelfs empty, a  wave of panic has spread throughout the consumer markets in Phuket and the rest of the country nation which is dependent on consumerism.

While many are concerned about where and how they’ll keep hydrated, here the Siamerican shows off his brand new three-stage water filtration system.

Buying a water filter is  a proactive step to become more sustainable and less dependent on packaged consumer goods such as bottled water during a time when such goods are in shortage, increasingly expensive and just plain environmentally irresponsible.

The system the SW bought today connects directly to his tap water faucet and works by pushing tap water from the faucet through three cylinder shaped filters.

Namely, it includes a Polypropylene  or PP filter, which is a type of sediment filter resembling a large cigarette butt.

The second stage filter is a Granular Activated Carbon or Inline GAC  filter and the third and final stage is an Activated Carbon block (CTO) carbon filter.

The Siamerican bought this three stage filter from Big C in Phuket. Peculiarly not in shortage with many choices on offer, the brand he chose is a local Thai one called Colandas.

The total cost of the system was about 1,400 baht. Installation was simple and involved attaching a tube-hose to the faucet spout which screwed on perfectly. The filters needed to be removed of their plastic wrapping and the filter casings tightened before using.

The filters need to be replaced after between 6 months to a year and have a usage life each of about 2,000 gallons. Replacement filters cost between 200 to 450 baht each, bringing the yearly cost for such system to about 600 to 1350 baht.

The Siamerican first used a similar water filtration system to purify and filter his tap water several years ago when he was a University student in Bangkok.

That filter was only a two-stage carbon and ceramic filter and did him good service for about a year without any problems or sicknesses arising, considering the apartment was located near industrial slums of the capital.

 
The Universal Envoy says:

Smart buy! Not only will you cut down on amount of trash generated; you will also have limitless filtered water on demand!